0.5.0-next.2 • Published 10 months ago

enonic-fp v0.5.0-next.2

Weekly downloads
180
License
MIT
Repository
github
Last release
10 months ago

Enonic FP

npm version

Functional programming helpers for Enonic XP. This library provides fp-ts wrappers around the Enonic-interfaces provided by enonic-types, which again wraps the official standard libraries (in jars).

Code generation

We recommend using this library together with the xp-codegen-plugin Gradle plugin. xp-codegen-plugin will create TypeScript interfaces for your content-types. Those interfaces will be very useful together with this library.

Requirements

  1. Enonic 7 setup with Webpack
  2. Individual Enonic client libraries installed (this library only contains wrappers around the interfaces)

Motivation

Most functions in this library wraps the result in an IOEither<EnonicError, A>.

This gives us two things:

  1. It forces the developer to handle the error case using fold
  2. It allows us to pipe the results from one operation into the next using chain (or map). Chain expects another IOEither<EnonicError, A> to be returned. When the first left<EnonicError> is returned, the pipe will short circuit to the error case in fold.

This style of programming encourages us to write re-usable functions that we can compose together using pipe.

Usage

Example 1: Get content by key service

In this example we have a service that returns Article content – that has a key as id – as json. Or if something goes wrong, we return an Internal Server Error instead.

import {fold} from "fp-ts/IOEither";
import {pipe} from "fp-ts/pipeable";
import {get as getContent} from "enonic-fp/content";
import {Article} from "../../site/content-types/article/article"; // 1
import {internalServerError, ok} from "enonic-fp/controller";

export function get(req: XP.Request): XP.Response { // 2
  const program = pipe( // 3
    getContent<Article>(req.params.key!), // 4
    fold( // 5
      internalServerError,
      ok
    )
  );

  return program(); // 6
}
  1. We import an interface Article { ... } generated by xp-codegen-plugin.
  2. We use the imported Request and Response to control the shape of our controller.
  3. We use the pipe function from fp-ts to pipe the result of one function into the next one.
  4. We use the get function from content – here renamed getContent so it won't collide with the get function in the controller – to return some content where the type is IOEither<EnonicError, Content<Article>>.
  5. The last thing we usually do in a controller is to unpack the IOEither. This is done with fold(handleError, handleSuccess). enonic-fp comes with a set of functions that creates an IO<Response> with the data. There are pre-configured functions that can be used in fold for some of the most common http status numbers. Like ok() and internalServerError().
  6. We have so far constructed a constant program of type IO<Response>, but we have not yet performed a single side effect. It's time to perform those side effects, so we run the IO by calling it, and return the Response we get back.

Example 2: Delete content by key and publish

In this example we delete come content by key. We are first doing this on the draft branch. And then we publish it to the master branch.

We will return a http error based on the type of error that happened (trough a lookup in the errorsKeyToStatus map). Or we return a http status 204, indicating success.

import {chain, fold} from "fp-ts/IOEither";
import {pipe} from "fp-ts/pipeable";
import {publish, remove} from "enonic-fp/content";
import {run} from "enonic-fp/context";
import {errorResponse, noContent} from "enonic-fp/controller";

function del(req: XP.Request): XP.Response {
  const program = pipe(
    runOnBranchDraft(
      remove(req.params.key!) // 1
    ),
    chain(() => publish(req.params.key!)),  // 2
    fold( // 3
      errorResponse({ req, i18nPrefix: "articleErrors" }), // 4
      noContent // 5
    )
  );

  return program();
}

export {del as delete}; // 6

const runOnBranchDraft = run({ branch: 'draft' }); // 7
  1. We call the remove function with the key to delete some content. We want to do this on the draft branch, so we wrap the call in the runInDraftContext function that is defined below. Remove returns IOEither<EnonicError, void>. If the content didn't exist, it will return an EnonicError with of type "https://problem.item.no/xp/not-found", that can be handled in the fold().
  2. We want to publish our change from the draft branch to the master branch. The publish() function in enonic-fp has an overload that only takes the key as a string and defaults to publish from draft to master.
  3. To create our Response we call fold, where we handle the error and success cases, and return IO<Response>.
  4. The errorResponse() function use the HttpError.status field to know which http status number to use on the Response. It can optionally take the Request and a i18nPrefix as parameters.
    • The Request adds the HttpError.instance on the return object, and it will check if req.mode !== 'live', and if yes, return more details about the error (this is to prevent exploits based on the error messages).
    • The usage of i18nPrefix is detailed the i18n for error messages chapter.
  5. Since this is a delete operation we return a https status 204 on the success case, which means "no content".
  6. Since delete is a keyword in JavaScript and TypeScript, we have to do this hack to return the delete function.
  7. This is a curried version of ContextLib.run. It returns a new function – here assigned to the constant runOnBranchDraft – that takes an IO as parameter (which all the wrapped functions already return as IOEither).

Example 3: Thymeleaf, multiple queries, and http request

In this example we do three queries. First we look up an article by key, then we search for comments related to that article based on the articles key. And then we get a list of open positions in the company, that we want to display on the web page.

import {sequenceT} from "fp-ts/Apply";
import {Json} from "fp-ts/Either";
import {chain, fold, ioEither, IOEither, map} from "fp-ts/IOEither";
import {pipe} from "fp-ts/pipeable";
import {Content, QueryResponse} from "/lib/xp/content";
import {getRenderer} from "enonic-fp/thymeleaf";
import {EnonicError} from "enonic-fp/errors";
import {get as getContent, query} from "enonic-fp/content";
import {bodyAsJson, request} from "enonic-fp/http";
import {Article} from "../../site/content-types/article/article";
import {Comment} from "../../site/content-types/comment/comment";
import {ok, unsafeRenderErrorPage} from "enonic-fp/controller";
import {tupled} from "fp-ts/function";

const view = resolve('./article.html');
const errorView = resolve('../../templates/error.html');
const renderer = getRenderer<ThymeleafParams>(view); // 1

export function get(req: XP.Request): XP.Response {
  const articleId = req.params.key!;

  return pipe(
    sequenceT(ioEither)( // 2
      getContent<Article>(articleId),
      getCommentsByArticleKey(articleId),
      getOpenPositionsOverHttp()
    ),
    map(tupled(createThymeleafParams)), // 3
    chain(renderer), // 4
    fold(
      unsafeRenderErrorPage(errorView), // 5
      ok
    )
  )();
}

function getCommentsByArticleKey(articleId: string)
  : IOEither<EnonicError, QueryResponse<Comment>> {

  return query<Comment>({
    contentTypes: ["com.example:comment"],
    count: 100,
    query: `data.articleId = '${articleId}'`
  });
}

function getOpenPositionsOverHttp(): IOEither<EnonicError, Json> {
  return pipe(
    request("https://example.com/api/open-positions"), // 6
    chain(bodyAsJson)
  );
}

function createThymeleafParams( // 7
  article: Content<Article>,
  comments: QueryResponse<Comment>,
  openPositions: Json
): ThymeleafParams {
  return {
    id: article._id,
    data: article.data,
    comments: comments.hits,
    openPositions
  };
}

interface ThymeleafParams {
  readonly id: string;
  readonly data: Article;
  readonly comments: ReadonlyArray<Comment>;
  readonly openPositions: Json
}
  1. getRenderer() is a curried version of ThymeleafLib.render(). It takes ThymeleafParams (defined below) as a type parameter and the view as a parameter, and returns a function with this signature:
    (params: ThymeleafParams) => IOEither<EnonicError, string>, where the string is the finished rendered page.
  2. We do a sequenceT taking the three IOEither<EnonicError, A> as input, and getting an IOEither with the results in a tuple (IOEither<EnonicError, [Content<Article>, QueryResponse<Comment>, Json]>). The first two are queries in Enonic, and the last one is over http.
  3. We then map over the tuple, using createThymeleafParams(). But first we use the tupled function on createThymeleafParams() to give us a new version of createThymeleafParams that takes the parameters as a tuple, instead of as individual arguments. A good rule of thumb is to always use tupled together with sequenceT!
  4. We use the render() function in a chain(), since it returns an IOEither<EnonicError, string>.
  5. If any of the functions in the pipe has returned a Left<EnonicError>, we need to handle the EnonicError. In this case we want to render an error page. The unsafeRenderErrorPage() takes the errorView (html page) as parameter, which should be a template for EnonicError. If the templating succeeds, an IO<Response> is created with the page as the body, and with the http status from the EnonicError. But if it fails, we just need to let it fail completely and handled by Enonic XP, because we don't want an infinite loop of failing templating.
  6. We use an overloaded version of HttpLib.request, which only takes the url as parameter. We then pipe it into the bodyAsJson function that parses the json in the Request.body and returns an EnonicError if it fails.
  7. The createThymeleafParams function gathers all the data and creates one new object that the Thymeleaf-renderer will take as input.

i18n for error messages

Custom error messages for every endpoint

There is support for adding internationalization for error-messages. This is done, when you generate the Response using the errorResponse({ req: Request, i18nPrefix: string}) method.

The i18n-key to use to look up the message has the following shape: ${i18nPrefix}.title.${typeString} where typeString is the last section of EnonicError.type. To support every error in enonic-fp, typeString can only be one of these:

  • bad-request-error
  • not-found
  • internal-server-error
  • missing-id-provider
  • publish-error
  • unpublish-error
  • bad-gateway

If your i18nPrefix is e.g "getArticleError", then you can add the following to your phrases.properties to get customized error messages for different endpoints.

getArticleError.title.bad-request-error=Problems with client parameters
getArticleError.title.not-found=No Article Found
getArticleError.title.internal-server-error=Can not retreive article.
getArticleError.title.missing-id-provider=Missing ID Provider.
getArticleError.title.publish-error=Unable to publish the article.
getArticleError.title.unpublish-error=Unable to unpublish the article
getArticleError.title.bad-gateway=Unable to retreive open positions.

Fallback error messages

We recommend adding the following (but translated) keys to your phrases.properties file, as they will provide backup error messages for all instances where custom error messages have not been specified.

errors.title.bad-request-error=Bad request error
errors.title.not-found=Not found
errors.title.internal-server-error=Internal Server Error
errors.title.missing-id-provider=Missing ID Provider.
errors.title.publish-error=Unable to publish data
errors.title.unpublish-error=Unable to unpublish data
errors.title.bad-gateway=Bad gateway

Alternatively you could use the status number as the typeString-part of the key. But this will not be able to separate different errors with the same status (e.g both internal-server-error, missing-id-provider and publish-error has status = 500).

errors.title.400=Bad request error
errors.title.404=Not found
errors.title.500=Internal Server Error
errors.title.502=Bad gateway

Building the project

npm run build
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