2.0.0 • Published 1 year ago

transplexer-hyperscribe v2.0.0

Weekly downloads
3
License
MIT
Repository
github
Last release
1 year ago

Build Status

Transplexer-Hyperscribe

Transplexer integration for Hyperscribe

Overview

This library contains a set of functions that integrates transplexer with hyperscribe, thus creating a mechanism for reactive DOM updates.

The goal of this library is to allow lightweight declarative, direct and efficient DOM manipulation while keeping the runtime footprint relatively low.

Contents

Installation

Install from the NPM repository with NPM:

npm install transplexer-hyperscribe

or with Yarn:

yarn add transplexer-hyperscribe

Binding callbacks to DOM mutations using pipes

The gist of this library is to allow pipes to drive the DOM mutations. There are three groups of DOM mutations that result from change in state:

  • Modify DOM node properties or attributes.
  • Toggle a single DOM node.
  • Synchronize a group of DOM nodes with arrays.

Setting/changing properties

To react to changes in state by mutating properties, we use a dynamicProp(pipe, propertyName) function. For example, let's say we want to update the href property of an anchor element dynamically:

import pipe from 'transplexer';
import {a} from 'hyperscribe';
import {dynamicProp} from 'transplexer-hyperscribe';

const p = pipe();

a({href: '#foo'}, dynamicProp(p, 'href'));

Now whenever something is sent to p, the href attribute is updated to whatever value was sent.

The rules by which the property name is used is the same as in hyperscribe. Thanks to this, we can use dynamicProp to set things like style rules (e.g., style.width) and ARIA properties (e.g., aria.valuemax, role).

Toggling classes

Toggling classes is very common mutation. It's a special case of property mutations, and this library provides a separate function toggleClass(pipe, className) which does this.

The toggleClass will treat values as Boolean: each truthy value will add the specified class name, and falsy values will remove them.

import pipe from 'transplexer';
import {div} from 'hyperscribe';
import {dynamicProp} from 'transplexer-hyperscribe';

const p = pipe();

div({class: 'menu'}, toggleClass(p, 'open'));

Hotswapping DOM nodes

While using display:none will be effective in most cases, we may want to do something more complex with the DOM and literally remove a DOM node from the DOM tree and swap it out for another one. This is where hotswap(pipe, defaultElement, altElement) becomes useful.

This function takes a pipe and two elements. The first one is called a 'default', and the other one is the 'alternative'. The default element is rendered immediately where hotswap is called, and then the pipe controls when and which of the two are rendered. The default element maps to a falsy value coming through the pipe, whereas the alternative is rendered for any truthy values.

Here's a simple example:

import pipe from 'transplexer';
import {div} from 'hyperscribe';
import {hotswap} from 'transplexer-hyperscribe';

const formErrorPipe = pipe();

div(
  hotswap(
    formErrorPipe, 
    document.createComment('placeholder'),
    div('Houston, we have a problem!')
  ),
);

formErrorPipe.send(true); // shows the form error

Elements suddenly appearing and disappearing can be a jarring experience. Because of this, the hotswap function has support for making transitions and animations before elements are removed from the DOM tree. To add a class to an element before it is swapped out, we use the removeClass property (yes, it's a custom property).

import pipe from 'transplexer';
import {div} from 'hyperscribe';
import {hotswap} from 'transplexer-hyperscribe';

const formErrorPipe = pipe();

div(
  hotswap(
    formErrorPipe, 
    document.createComment('placeholder'),
    div(
      {removeClass: 'exit'},
      'Houston, we have a problem!'
    ),
  ),
);

When hotswap sees the removeClass property it will assume that this class triggers some kind of animation or transition effect, and will wait for the effect to finish before removing the node. If there is no animation, the node does not get removed, so it is recommended to always add an animation when using the removeClass property.

Dynamic text

Although it's possible to use dynamicProp with textContent, it does require the dynamic portion of the text to take up the entire contents of the element. To crate a stand-alone text node that represents a dynamic text, we use the dynamicText(pipe, initialText) function.

import pipe from 'transplexer';
import {div} from 'hyperscribe';
import {dynamicText} from 'transplexer-hyperscribe';

const p = pipe();

div('Hello, ', dynamicText(p, 'World'), '!');

Managing lists of DOM nodes

One of the most difficult tasks when it comes to managing DOM nodes is managing lists of DOM nodes that are generated based on arrays, and keeping it in sync with the array from which they are created.

Most modern DOM libraries (including virtual DOM ones) will allow for creating both keyed and non-keyed lists of nodes. That is, nodes that are either identified or not identified uniquely. In the interest of simplicity, this library only allows the keyed lists.

Every DOM node that represents the list item (it may have children) in a keyed list must have a key, a value that uniquely identifies it. Keys are always converted to string, to it should be a value that preserves its uniqueness after it's converted to a key.

In order to manage this type of lists, we use the dynamicList(pipe, initialData, renderChild, toKey) function. Let's first go over the arguments briefly and then talk about its usage. The arguments are as follows:

  • pipe - the pipe that will send out new versions of the list (it does not have to be a completely new instance of an array, it can be the same instance as before).
  • initialData - the initial state of the list.
  • renderChild - a function that takes an object or a value representing the list item and a pipe with updates to the value, and renders a child node from it. The function must always return a single root node, but the node may have any number of child nodes.
  • toKey - a function that takes the value of the item, and returns a key that uniquely identifies it. This argument is optional, and defaults to a function that returns the key property of the value. In other words, as long as all values are objects with a key property, you don't have to specify this function. This function should return a value that retains its uniqueness when converted to a string (numbers and strings usually work better).

Here's a simple example:

import pipe from 'transplexer';
import {ul, li, div, span} from 'hyperscribe';
import {dynamicList, dynamicProp} from 'transplexer-hyperscribe';
import {toTransformer as t$} from 'transplexer-tools';

const users = [
  {name: 'John Doe', email: 'jdoe@example.com', id: 11, key: '11'},
  {name: 'Jane Doe', email: 'doej@example.com', id: 42, key: '42'},
];

function renderUser(user, updatePipe) {
  const namePipe = updatePipe.extends(t$(user => user.name));
  const emailPipe = updatePipe.extends(t$(user => user.email));

  return li(
    div('name: ', span(
      user.name, 
      dynamicProp(namePipe, 'textContent')
    )),
    div('email: ', span(
      user.email, 
      dynamicProp(emailPipe, 'textContent')
    )),
  );
}

const userListUpdatesPipe = pipe();

ul(
  dynamicList(
    userUpdates,
    users,
    renderUser,
  ),
)

In the example code, the renderUser function is the most important part. It should be pointed out that this function is only called once per every new list item. When list items are updated, they retain the same key but may contain new data. The render function will receive such updates through the second argument, which is a pipe.

The render function sets up its own more granular pipes that will handle the updates to the name and email fields. It should also be noted that this example does not include performance optimizations such as blocking the pipes when the values haven't changed from the previous/initial value.

Updates to the list are handled using the edit lists, which are created using an algorithm borrowed from Snabbdom. They ensure that minimum amount of shuffling is done in order to update the list.

2.0.0

1 year ago

1.0.1

2 years ago

1.0.0

2 years ago